Collect, analyse & (re)assemble- Artists and designers looked at.

Trying to find artists and/or designers who work with pencils in a more creative, or conceptual way is tough. Even from typing up the words ‘artists who work in pencil’, it brings up pages of life drawings. Not that, that’s such an awful thing. Narrowing my search to ‘mark making artists’, I came across some unusual outcomes, which I didn’t think about before. That just goes to show that there’s always someone who thinks of this object in a different way, or uses them.

 

Abbey Withington was one of my first finds, while looking for different mark makers. She creates these interesting, colourful patterns made via screenprint. They almost look as if they could of been hand drawn, just from looking at the textured markings. While these appear to be refreshing to look at; how each shape is spaced out appear to have been put in to consideration. Each colour, pattern and shape do not seem to be too repetitive and they seem to work together well. As an illustrator, I may need to bare in mind of this method; making careful decisions on what pattern, mark or how something will look on the pages of the book.

Other than that, observing closer at the marks, the patterns and textured strokes seem to stand out among all of the white space.

Reedy’s Legend of Zelda wood-block prints are what caught my eye. They’re captivating, bold and very detailed. They’re able to capture character among the characters in such a simple way.

I adore the use of thick lines he uses, and the amount of detail that goes in to each print’s astonishing. In terms of this method of production, I plan to use some printing in my tests for the collection as a form of presenting the object. What I mean to state is, the teeth and name etchings and the patterns on the pencils for instance could be printed multiples amounts of times, or could be used to create another piece of imagery with in the book to make it look appealing to those who look at it.

Honestly,  I didn’t ever think you could obtain something like this from just colouring pencils.  Though, this one is most likely not all in pencil, but it’s another nice example of an illustration that uses pencils. This piece was created by Rebecca Green; an American Illustrator, who works with gouache, acrylic, colored pencil, and ink. What I liked about this was how simple and traditional it was.

 By using groups of objects, Federico Uribe gathers them all together and creates sculptures from them; to me, it looks complicated. It may be, if I were to try something similar to this, I might try building the sculpture out on its side instead.

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Collect, analyse & (re)assemble- Part 1

How we organise or do something always has a system to it or we always have a way of doing something, which we don’t pay any heed to. Looking back on this particular subject, I feel quite ecstatic about it, as it can go in many different ways. I can start to put in to consideration of how I’m going to present my collection. I haven’t quite clarified that here, yet, but I shall do so now.

From going over the series of ideas that I mapped out on a brainstorm, I’ve come to the decision of collecting pencils. You can do so much with them, that you don’t even realise. Some may state that they’re only for the use of drawing, but I can tell you that there’s a whole lot more to them than simply that; you can draw, doodle, make many types of marks, model from them, use them to draft, arrange them, catagorise them, build sculptures, use the sharpenings for art and even print the little teeth and scratch marks on to paper. I want to continue with this idea in mind, and focus the subject of pencils on the two words I used in our discussion with Adrian about ideas: ‘Starting point’.  

So, the term ‘starting point’, it could be that I start off with how we started off with pencils as a kid, or the typical functions that we often use them for.  I may present this in a series of different mark making techniques, but I did originally consider this idea and from that, I began collecting many different marks, patterns and textures as references, to help give me an idea of how I can put the pencils to use.

IMG_20160314_152452 IMG_20160314_152348 IMG_20160314_152345 IMG_20160314_152400IMG_20160314_152450  IMG_20160314_152357 IMG_20160314_152340

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simply to give you a quick grasp of what I’ve been working on for the last couple of days, here are some examples of leave rubbings I’ve done with a few of the pencils:

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Something I found particularly fascinating about these tests were the different variations of marks, lines and depth you can obtain, depending on the way you move the pencil,  change the pencil or even the technique in how you press the pencil to the page. I chose to experiment with the leaf rubbings first, as it was a starting point that I remember doing in art classes when I was in year 1 or 2 of Primary school. It was one of the first things we would  do with that tool of trade.

While playing around with these; previously, I went ahead and started to draw anything that came to my mind when it came to pencils. It left me with some new ideas, in how we develop our skills with the medium. We can start off drawing a doodle —> then to a sketch —> and later on a detailed drawing.

Some things I may need to keep in mind:

  • What’s going to be presented in the book?
  • How is the book going to be presented?
  • How will the pencil collection be presented?
  • Photos? drawings?

 

 

Artist/designer of the week: Ingrid Bartel-karsten

Found this gem among my searches for pencil marks; I was left in such awe over how considerate she is with her use of marks. They’re so delicate in some areas and in other parts of the image, they’re rough. While this is the case, this may be due to what the image in the painting/drawing could be? or what I would like to think, is that she’s using the marks as a way to communicate the circumstances with in the picture.

Here’s an example of one of her drawings to the right, there appears to be at least three people occupying the image. One of them looks quite dominant and the other, submissive?  this is quite hard to make out, but there’s tension approaching between them. The colours add a very, fine hint in to what mood could be being portrayed. Other than that, her paintings leave me very intrigued to know what they could be about.

There’s another one, which left me pondering what’s going on.

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While the artist has tagged the following with ‘woman’, ’emotion’, ‘society’ and ‘struggle’. There’s quite a struggle, indeed. This woman here struggling to find out what’s going on in this drawing. Speaking on terms of this, it’s called ‘Die Schlaufe’ which Google has translated this as ‘The loop’.

 

Other posters.

While I had a little free time over the weekend, I really, really wanted to at least get down a poster idea for one of GOATBEDs songs, which was another song that I unfortunately didn’t choose for the final three songs.  I made a little sketch of an idea I had for the song ‘Yama-ha’.  This time, I wanted to try and play around with a different kind of medium for the creation of this poster and that medium would be Promarkers this time, as when it comes to this song in particular, it’s very soothing to my ears and yet, there would be other times where it creates this ball of burning energy inside of me.

I decided as this in a way would be still playing around with brush strokes, except this time it would be with the brush on the pen tips.

Concerntrating on the song, I notice that all of my other senses seem to shut off and only my ears are picking up on the sounds of the beat being created. I imagine myself being the only person around; the atmosphere shadows out and there’s an array of bright, vibrant colours that illuminate my path and all I can hear is YAMA-HA playing in the distance.

I made it so, the figure was being absored in to the cast of shadows. I used a normal pen for this, owing to there are times where the song has this very edgy sensation. I’m a little unhappy with how the kneck turned out, as I don’t usually draw the body form from this angle; it was pretty challenging.

After colouring in with more vibrant colours, I  was hesitant to leave it as just as it was. There had to be something that could fill that blank void. I thought about probably filling it in black, but that would leave the image looking dull. I found a photograph from the previous photography session, which had been an error of one of my tests, so I placed it down on a new layer in Photoshop and played around with the clipping mask.

I was frustrated with this outcome. It was too sharp and the line quality was terrible; I know i will never be satisfied with any of these kind of drawings, but the only thing that I was quite pleased with was how the colours bodly stand out among the shades of grey.

I set the layer to multiply this time. A bit nicer, different. It’s starting to grasp that edgy feeling I wanted.

I despised the corners around the image. They somehow made the image look flat; I didn’t want that, therefore, I used a soft eraser setting to lightly brush it away.

I had to keep thinking back to what I researched about in the project; how can I capture that raw emotion? how can I portray that? To be quite blunt with this, I don’t think the images for this poster are quite there yet. What I’ve obtained from this song is difficult to depict, and yet, that didn’t stop me from testing this idea out further. I considered that maybe, I could try animating all of these outcomes together to see what I get.

Collections, groups, lists.

Another Monday morning and another talk, but this talk was with Matthew first. He gave us some more ideas to start thinking over, and he also presented us with some ideas of how something that we wouldn’t consider as a collection can be a collection, for example, the words, images and pages with in a magazine, or another good one can be all of the files, images and folders that are in a folder or on your desktop screen on your computer.

So, basically to sum it up, there are also things that aren’t objects or aren’t physically there that can be grouped; collected, analysed, organised and assembled. After the talk, I went ahead to the library and took a screenshot of my unorganised usb storage:

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Honestly, there’s no system to the way the things are organised, but then again, upon claiming that, they’ve been sorted out specifically. This may not be a clear image, but each file has been arranged by name ascendingly and they can easily be re-assembled by changing the sorting method.

Another example of a collection could be a contact sheet?

Or, nature can become a collection. There’s herds of sheep that are re-arranged and grouped up in to a collection by a Sheep dog or their owner.

I found this particular photograph to be astounding, due to how the sheeps have arranged themselves on the field. It’s not as if they’ve huddled themselves in to one big group, but they’ve spread themselves out across and have only stuck to the sheep that they know or where there’s specific patches where they feel comfortable.

 

Penguins are another great example of how they’ve re-assembled and gathered together.

Currently, while I’m typing this post up, I’m starting to get more of a clear insight in to how things can be grouped, collected and re-assembled. There’s another example, which I wasn’t specifically sure on whether it can be considered a collection or not, but it will somehow link back in to the previous project: ‘The soundtrack of our lives’. Music is created with a collection; a song is a collection of vocals, lyrics, words and sound. Luckily enough, Adrian’s talk clarified this up a bit more, when we were discussing ideas and starting to look in to how we can approach this. I felt so relieved when he started to discuss this idea, as it was one I had considered in mentioning in the post. It would of been pretty interesting to have something that was music related and can be collected in some form, and yes, he did go on to talk about ways this could be done, such as in forms of a music video.

However, I have a feeling this could be done in another way, seeing as our poster project was based on the songs. Even each poster contained a collection of marks, emotion, associations to do with the song.

Just to quickly jump back to Matthew’s discussion,  he mentioned about hoarders. Now, as soon as this was brought up, I recalled an American show called ‘Storage hunters’, where people go around and collect more junk that belonged to people who enjoyed collecting, but couldn’t keep it as they were in debt. There’s people who can store all of the things that they can’t fit in to their house, they can place it all in a rented storage shed, but another enjoyable thing about this particular way of keeping hold of the objects is that they can put it in boxes, then place it inside the storage shed. That’s one way of assembling and organising.

At this point, I have an inkling that the way something is organised and reassembled may affect the function in how that thing may work for someone, or could possibly influence a change to how it may be seen or re-arranged in future.

 

Collect, analyse and (re)collect.

You never ever seem to notice the small collection of books gathering up on your shelf, or even the bundle of pencils, pens ad other stationary that clutters up in your drawers. There’s always a system and a way of how things are organised, and this is the new task that I’ve been set to work on, discuss, analyse, experiment, collect and start to develop.

When I start to think about this subject, I thought at first that this was going to be a pretty, damn hard subject to figure out, but as I returned home and arrived to my room… it hit me.  I have several collections of my own, but I had never considered them as a collection at all and I did have a strategy of how I line them up, organise the objects or even spacing them out in my room a certain way and it’s extraordinary.

As much as I like boasting about my little gathering of figures, or manga; I don’t like talking about it to the whole class. It makes me nervous.

The loom band jar.

My manga collection (which seems to grow every time I go into Waterstones.)

I have far too many keychains/keycharms now, but here’s the collection I have pinned to the wall.

Things to take in to consideration during the project:

What makes them a collection?

what defines them? how do they change when they are a mass? what are their qualities? what do they do? what shape are they? what are their functions? do their qualities change when reassembled? how do you reassemble them/organise them? Are they any different when they are resorted?

Now, the final outcome is going to be a book that’ll document or that will discuss our collection. I’m having a little trouble processing my thoughts/ideas in to how I’ll present my findings into this book, but I do have some ideas of what I want to do for the collection.

Collection ideas:

  1. Things about my cats: This could be a collection of images, sketches of them, I could also have records of events, for example their vet slips, food packaging.
  2. Letter packaging: Collecting a series of different packaging that’s to do with postage.
  3. Cosplay materials: Recording things to do with this subject.
  4. Pencils: I have so many of them, that I can’t even count them all. Pencils are a pillar to anything. You can make many different marks and record in different ways with them; you’ll also get many different results. There’s also so many varieties of pencil types.

A definite collection choice so far for me has been the pencils, I also thought about doing pens, though, a pencil can be recorded in numerous ways. I’m looking forward to playing around with the ideas that I’ve got so far.