Collect, analyse & (re)assemble- Artists and designers looked at.

Trying to find artists and/or designers who work with pencils in a more creative, or conceptual way is tough. Even from typing up the words ‘artists who work in pencil’, it brings up pages of life drawings. Not that, that’s such an awful thing. Narrowing my search to ‘mark making artists’, I came across some unusual outcomes, which I didn’t think about before. That just goes to show that there’s always someone who thinks of this object in a different way, or uses them.

 

Abbey Withington was one of my first finds, while looking for different mark makers. She creates these interesting, colourful patterns made via screenprint. They almost look as if they could of been hand drawn, just from looking at the textured markings. While these appear to be refreshing to look at; how each shape is spaced out appear to have been put in to consideration. Each colour, pattern and shape do not seem to be too repetitive and they seem to work together well. As an illustrator, I may need to bare in mind of this method; making careful decisions on what pattern, mark or how something will look on the pages of the book.

Other than that, observing closer at the marks, the patterns and textured strokes seem to stand out among all of the white space.

Reedy’s Legend of Zelda wood-block prints are what caught my eye. They’re captivating, bold and very detailed. They’re able to capture character among the characters in such a simple way.

I adore the use of thick lines he uses, and the amount of detail that goes in to each print’s astonishing. In terms of this method of production, I plan to use some printing in my tests for the collection as a form of presenting the object. What I mean to state is, the teeth and name etchings and the patterns on the pencils for instance could be printed multiples amounts of times, or could be used to create another piece of imagery with in the book to make it look appealing to those who look at it.

Honestly,  I didn’t ever think you could obtain something like this from just colouring pencils.  Though, this one is most likely not all in pencil, but it’s another nice example of an illustration that uses pencils. This piece was created by Rebecca Green; an American Illustrator, who works with gouache, acrylic, colored pencil, and ink. What I liked about this was how simple and traditional it was.

 By using groups of objects, Federico Uribe gathers them all together and creates sculptures from them; to me, it looks complicated. It may be, if I were to try something similar to this, I might try building the sculpture out on its side instead.

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