Collect, analyse & (re)assemble: Development in plan and experiments.

Going over this very quickly, I’ll highlight what my plans are and what exactly it is, that I’m doing for this current project because I don’t think I’ve classified it clearly. While my subject is called ‘Starting point’, it’s a collection of pencils. I would like to think that actually, there’s more than just one collection from simply looking at this one. It’s pretty much a collection with in a collection, with in a collection with in a collection. I thought this collection was going to be very basic, simple, but it turns out it isn’t.

The pencil collection has more to it, than it meets the eye. How it’s collected, the size, the number of bumps, scratches, marks and teeth marks it has, the patterns, its colour, its thickness, its type. I constantly think about how I’m going to portray these traits with in this project to help define what the collection is, or at least summarise it. So, my main focus with it has been it’s use and how they can be catagorised, sorted. When looking back at the term ‘Stating point’, a pencil is always there to take an idea from your mind and link it to paper. You take a concept and put it down, develop and create something new.

I could rant on more about this, but basically, I want to show the start and finish of how a pencil can be used as a collection.

Last time, I put forward my marks research, I was thrilled, but it led me to some new ideas on how I could take it further; in my sketchbook, I simply started to draw down energetic lines with a group of pencils held together. Moving them across the paper, then trying to recreate the patterns I saw from the research.

     

For the teeth marks, logos and any indents on the pencils, I had to experiment with how I was going to make that in to an image. I did start to brood over this idea quite a bit and I wasn’t getting anywhere; they could’ve been photographed and placed together? they could’ve been drawn out? I could’ve even photographed the marks and logos, edited them on Photoshop and then made them in to a screenprint? but my time was running out, I was also at home at the time, so the only thing I tried out was printing them by hand with block printing ink.

The print on the left hand side was one of my favourites, I liked the diamond shaped marks that came out of it. Those marks were made from one of the mechanical pencils I had– the ones with the rubber grips.  Each set’s unique in its own way, there’s a range of different marks, patterns and even when I was rolling one pencil across, they would make this nice, smooth, smudgey mark on the paper.

After, I decided to see how I can try out a 3D aspect, but then again, it would’ve come out 2D once presented on paper, anyhow, I did some testing of this before, but in the library:

If you have noticed, when changing the order of something; it becomes an entirely different thing to look at. The collection itself was organised in to seperate different colours, then changed once again. Then again. From doing this, I learnt that I could take advantage of this and then sepereate  every single pencil and organise them in to categories(As shown in the first photograph).

I continued this experiment at home, but changed it. I tried to build a model, that would involve the collection as a whole:

 

After speaking to Matthew about my ideas and how I’m putting my book together, I did at one point over the holiday felt that I was taking far too much time with the content and development, than the outcome of the book. However, from the book binding session from the last week of term, it allowed me to experiment with how I can lay out each image with in the book and what bind I can use. I have a vague idea of how I want it, but i’m not sure of what the bind would be called, if I combined two methods of patching the pages together. THIS is what I need to look in to, I also need to remind myself, that if I leave something to the last moment, I’ll end up with a rushed outcome and that’s not good. It’s no good at all.

 

 

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Collect, analyse & (re)assemble- Artists and designers looked at.

Trying to find artists and/or designers who work with pencils in a more creative, or conceptual way is tough. Even from typing up the words ‘artists who work in pencil’, it brings up pages of life drawings. Not that, that’s such an awful thing. Narrowing my search to ‘mark making artists’, I came across some unusual outcomes, which I didn’t think about before. That just goes to show that there’s always someone who thinks of this object in a different way, or uses them.

 

Abbey Withington was one of my first finds, while looking for different mark makers. She creates these interesting, colourful patterns made via screenprint. They almost look as if they could of been hand drawn, just from looking at the textured markings. While these appear to be refreshing to look at; how each shape is spaced out appear to have been put in to consideration. Each colour, pattern and shape do not seem to be too repetitive and they seem to work together well. As an illustrator, I may need to bare in mind of this method; making careful decisions on what pattern, mark or how something will look on the pages of the book.

Other than that, observing closer at the marks, the patterns and textured strokes seem to stand out among all of the white space.

Reedy’s Legend of Zelda wood-block prints are what caught my eye. They’re captivating, bold and very detailed. They’re able to capture character among the characters in such a simple way.

I adore the use of thick lines he uses, and the amount of detail that goes in to each print’s astonishing. In terms of this method of production, I plan to use some printing in my tests for the collection as a form of presenting the object. What I mean to state is, the teeth and name etchings and the patterns on the pencils for instance could be printed multiples amounts of times, or could be used to create another piece of imagery with in the book to make it look appealing to those who look at it.

Honestly,  I didn’t ever think you could obtain something like this from just colouring pencils.  Though, this one is most likely not all in pencil, but it’s another nice example of an illustration that uses pencils. This piece was created by Rebecca Green; an American Illustrator, who works with gouache, acrylic, colored pencil, and ink. What I liked about this was how simple and traditional it was.

 By using groups of objects, Federico Uribe gathers them all together and creates sculptures from them; to me, it looks complicated. It may be, if I were to try something similar to this, I might try building the sculpture out on its side instead.

Collect, analyse & (re)assemble- Part 1

How we organise or do something always has a system to it or we always have a way of doing something, which we don’t pay any heed to. Looking back on this particular subject, I feel quite ecstatic about it, as it can go in many different ways. I can start to put in to consideration of how I’m going to present my collection. I haven’t quite clarified that here, yet, but I shall do so now.

From going over the series of ideas that I mapped out on a brainstorm, I’ve come to the decision of collecting pencils. You can do so much with them, that you don’t even realise. Some may state that they’re only for the use of drawing, but I can tell you that there’s a whole lot more to them than simply that; you can draw, doodle, make many types of marks, model from them, use them to draft, arrange them, catagorise them, build sculptures, use the sharpenings for art and even print the little teeth and scratch marks on to paper. I want to continue with this idea in mind, and focus the subject of pencils on the two words I used in our discussion with Adrian about ideas: ‘Starting point’.  

So, the term ‘starting point’, it could be that I start off with how we started off with pencils as a kid, or the typical functions that we often use them for.  I may present this in a series of different mark making techniques, but I did originally consider this idea and from that, I began collecting many different marks, patterns and textures as references, to help give me an idea of how I can put the pencils to use.

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Simply to give you a quick grasp of what I’ve been working on for the last couple of days, here are some examples of leave rubbings I’ve done with a few of the pencils:

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Something I found particularly fascinating about these tests were the different variations of marks, lines and depth you can obtain, depending on the way you move the pencil,  change the pencil or even the technique in how you press the pencil to the page. I chose to experiment with the leaf rubbings first, as it was a starting point that I remember doing in art classes when I was in year 1 or 2 of Primary school. It was one of the first things we would  do with that tool of trade.

While playing around with these; previously, I went ahead and started to draw anything that came to my mind when it came to pencils. It left me with some new ideas, in how we develop our skills with the medium. We can start off drawing a doodle —> then to a sketch —> and later on a detailed drawing.

Some things I may need to keep in mind:

  • What’s going to be presented in the book?
  • How is the book going to be presented?
  • How will the pencil collection be presented?
  • Photos? drawings?