Design Competition: Poster workshop (P1)

The first part of our experimental poster work shop; getting in to our groups, we had a table with some objects and we were given some instructions to follow by Regular Practice. While it was a very constructive afternoon, I found it was getting messier by the moment as I worked my stick in with the ink on the paper.

I tried to imitate my chosen Exhibition image from the Barbican as best as I could, but I found it difficult to copy it fully. However, when I think back to the outcomes obtained, they appear to be far more exciting and interesting, as it’s a concept that has been created by me in an attempt to imitate the artists piece.

After following the first set task for our table, we moved on to work on the other tasks set on a different table and did the same after that. It did open my options and considerations up a bit, that when it comes to making marks or creating a new piece of work or concept, I should try to be more open and considerate of what tools and materials I use, as the end result may be a reflection of that.

Advertisements

Collect, analyse & (re)assemble: Development in plan and experiments.

Going over this very quickly, I’ll highlight what my plans are and what exactly it is, that I’m doing for this current project because I don’t think I’ve classified it clearly. While my subject is called ‘Starting point’, it’s a collection of pencils. I would like to think that actually, there’s more than just one collection from simply looking at this one. It’s pretty much a collection with in a collection, with in a collection with in a collection. I thought this collection was going to be very basic, simple, but it turns out it isn’t.

The pencil collection has more to it, than it meets the eye. How it’s collected, the size, the number of bumps, scratches, marks and teeth marks it has, the patterns, its colour, its thickness, its type. I constantly think about how I’m going to portray these traits with in this project to help define what the collection is, or at least summarise it. So, my main focus with it has been it’s use and how they can be catagorised, sorted. When looking back at the term ‘Stating point’, a pencil is always there to take an idea from your mind and link it to paper. You take a concept and put it down, develop and create something new.

I could rant on more about this, but basically, I want to show the start and finish of how a pencil can be used as a collection.

Last time, I put forward my marks research, I was thrilled, but it led me to some new ideas on how I could take it further; in my sketchbook, I simply started to draw down energetic lines with a group of pencils held together. Moving them across the paper, then trying to recreate the patterns I saw from the research.

     

For the teeth marks, logos and any indents on the pencils, I had to experiment with how I was going to make that in to an image. I did start to brood over this idea quite a bit and I wasn’t getting anywhere; they could’ve been photographed and placed together? they could’ve been drawn out? I could’ve even photographed the marks and logos, edited them on Photoshop and then made them in to a screenprint? but my time was running out, I was also at home at the time, so the only thing I tried out was printing them by hand with block printing ink.

The print on the left hand side was one of my favourites, I liked the diamond shaped marks that came out of it. Those marks were made from one of the mechanical pencils I had– the ones with the rubber grips.  Each set’s unique in its own way, there’s a range of different marks, patterns and even when I was rolling one pencil across, they would make this nice, smooth, smudgey mark on the paper.

After, I decided to see how I can try out a 3D aspect, but then again, it would’ve come out 2D once presented on paper, anyhow, I did some testing of this before, but in the library:

If you have noticed, when changing the order of something; it becomes an entirely different thing to look at. The collection itself was organised in to seperate different colours, then changed once again. Then again. From doing this, I learnt that I could take advantage of this and then sepereate  every single pencil and organise them in to categories(As shown in the first photograph).

I continued this experiment at home, but changed it. I tried to build a model, that would involve the collection as a whole:

 

After speaking to Matthew about my ideas and how I’m putting my book together, I did at one point over the holiday felt that I was taking far too much time with the content and development, than the outcome of the book. However, from the book binding session from the last week of term, it allowed me to experiment with how I can lay out each image with in the book and what bind I can use. I have a vague idea of how I want it, but i’m not sure of what the bind would be called, if I combined two methods of patching the pages together. THIS is what I need to look in to, I also need to remind myself, that if I leave something to the last moment, I’ll end up with a rushed outcome and that’s not good. It’s no good at all.

 

 

Collect, analyse & (re)assemble- Part 1

How we organise or do something always has a system to it or we always have a way of doing something, which we don’t pay any heed to. Looking back on this particular subject, I feel quite ecstatic about it, as it can go in many different ways. I can start to put in to consideration of how I’m going to present my collection. I haven’t quite clarified that here, yet, but I shall do so now.

From going over the series of ideas that I mapped out on a brainstorm, I’ve come to the decision of collecting pencils. You can do so much with them, that you don’t even realise. Some may state that they’re only for the use of drawing, but I can tell you that there’s a whole lot more to them than simply that; you can draw, doodle, make many types of marks, model from them, use them to draft, arrange them, catagorise them, build sculptures, use the sharpenings for art and even print the little teeth and scratch marks on to paper. I want to continue with this idea in mind, and focus the subject of pencils on the two words I used in our discussion with Adrian about ideas: ‘Starting point’.  

So, the term ‘starting point’, it could be that I start off with how we started off with pencils as a kid, or the typical functions that we often use them for.  I may present this in a series of different mark making techniques, but I did originally consider this idea and from that, I began collecting many different marks, patterns and textures as references, to help give me an idea of how I can put the pencils to use.

IMG_20160314_152452 IMG_20160314_152348 IMG_20160314_152345 IMG_20160314_152400IMG_20160314_152450  IMG_20160314_152357 IMG_20160314_152340

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simply to give you a quick grasp of what I’ve been working on for the last couple of days, here are some examples of leave rubbings I’ve done with a few of the pencils:

IMG_20160314_152526

Something I found particularly fascinating about these tests were the different variations of marks, lines and depth you can obtain, depending on the way you move the pencil,  change the pencil or even the technique in how you press the pencil to the page. I chose to experiment with the leaf rubbings first, as it was a starting point that I remember doing in art classes when I was in year 1 or 2 of Primary school. It was one of the first things we would  do with that tool of trade.

While playing around with these; previously, I went ahead and started to draw anything that came to my mind when it came to pencils. It left me with some new ideas, in how we develop our skills with the medium. We can start off drawing a doodle —> then to a sketch —> and later on a detailed drawing.

Some things I may need to keep in mind:

  • What’s going to be presented in the book?
  • How is the book going to be presented?
  • How will the pencil collection be presented?
  • Photos? drawings?

 

 

Artist/designer of the week: Ingrid Bartel-karsten

Found this gem among my searches for pencil marks; I was left in such awe over how considerate she is with her use of marks. They’re so delicate in some areas and in other parts of the image, they’re rough. While this is the case, this may be due to what the image in the painting/drawing could be? or what I would like to think, is that she’s using the marks as a way to communicate the circumstances with in the picture.

Here’s an example of one of her drawings to the right, there appears to be at least three people occupying the image. One of them looks quite dominant and the other, submissive?  this is quite hard to make out, but there’s tension approaching between them. The colours add a very, fine hint in to what mood could be being portrayed. Other than that, her paintings leave me very intrigued to know what they could be about.

There’s another one, which left me pondering what’s going on.

Untitled

While the artist has tagged the following with ‘woman’, ’emotion’, ‘society’ and ‘struggle’. There’s quite a struggle, indeed. This woman here struggling to find out what’s going on in this drawing. Speaking on terms of this, it’s called ‘Die Schlaufe’ which Google has translated this as ‘The loop’.

 

Looking in to abstract and contemporary artists.

I wanted to strengthen my research in to other artists for ‘The soundtrack of our lives.’. Thanks to a book called ‘The best of British contemporary illustration 2008’, I was able to obtain a few that has helped to broaden my ideas for the future, if I ever plan on coming back to this project (which is most likely going to happen).

I had several more that I looked at as well, but I only found them before I found this book and started looking in to contemporary and abstract art.

Jill Calder:

Jill Calder’s been working as an illustrated since 1993; she also deals with digital art and she lectures with the love of drawing, ideas, colour and ink.
She’s worked with numerous amount of clients globally.

There’s many reasons as to why I have chosen to talk about this illustrator; there’s something so vivid, colourful and original about her drawings that she’s produced so far. I was really admiring the bright tones she uses in specific illustrations, they create a gentle touch of emotion to the image that can be seen clearly; the lines used as well help convey that.

Observing closer, I would like us all to focus on the image with the cliff and the rabbit for a second. They’re quite blocked? as in the colours are solid ,but each shade is sharply built in to the picture to create curves, or to help highlight other aspects.

When regarding the progress I’ve made so far,  particularly on the poster tests with the mediums, I start to think of this illustrator, in terms of the lines that she’s used or how the edges of some of the objects in the image have this textured look to it.  I’m starting to believe that depending on the brush strokes used, they can assist the poster with depicting the emotion, for example, fast brush strokes could portray a sharp and edgy sensation?

Becca Thorne: While being another illustrator and also a print maker, Thorne’s illustrations are both bold and graphic.

Some examples of her work can be seen at: http://www.beccathorne.co.uk/Illustration.html

I have thought about using lino as a print method for the making of the poster, but it’s time consuming.

Back to the subject,  I adore the fuzzy lines that are an outcome of this printing method, they appear to be very unsettled.  I must admit that for the same reasons I’ve selected Calder to look at, is the same reason as for why I chose Thorne. She’s able to use colour and make it work well with lines and shape.

Takashi Murakami: Thinking back on Mr. Blue sky and Year 3000, he was the first artist that popped in to mind at the time. He’s a contemporary artist.  During the time I was re listening to these songs specifically, they create these mind-blowing visuals of colour and elongated shapes that emphasise this futuristic vision. I strongly think that Murakami does just this i n his arm work by using a varied use of bold, bright and contrasting colour.

All right. This is the last one, I promise.

Francoise Nielly: An abstract artist this time, and I didn’t find her in the book, but I went out and made a search of ‘Abstract art’, then found her work to which reminded me of another artist who did similar, though I cannot remember their name sadly.

big_cbaa46cc0b750217998579ac87a15eea index

It’s quite interesting to see how just a few mix of blocked in colours is able to bring out so much with in an image. Not only that, but the colours used are able to change the mood of a picture, as well as the brush strokes used.

I may have to consider this further with in my planning. I want to start testing out the kinds of colours I can use to link my emotions to them ( I’m going to use Photoshop for this after the first poster drafts are created), this will allow me to further my practice.

 

 

 

Drawing week-Part two- Circle line

In the one day, it was spent observing situations in people’s behaviour and manner on the Circle line in the Underground. While collecting this data,  I used a pen and my notebook to capture gestures made by those who sat in a particular seat, for example near the window or by the door.

I had to do this very quickly, but discreetly as well; this made the task pretty difficult, as there were several people who had caught on to what I was doing and I had to pretend that I was taking notes, or was looking at the maps above the person whom I was originally looking at.

The project itself was focusing more on collecting visual data and aiming to record postures, interactions and expressions.

There was something tense about this task; the feeling of having to get down everything that you see on a stranger’s appearance, while also pretending that you’re not doing anything suspicious. It wasn’t specifically suspicious in the first place, but to another person who doesn’t even know who you are, and yet, you’re doing that to them… it’s a little strange. I think that if I had blatantly sat in the opposite seat and faced someone on the tube; looking directly at them and drawing it down, and they happened to see me do that, they would probably get up and move? or call the police… ? anyway, what I was getting at is, if I had caught that sort of expression from them, it would of provided  a form of movement and it would of been beneficial towards the task.

That look of curiosity then to fear, or maybe anger? To be honest, I was a little disappointed with some of my outcomes. The majority of the passengers had their heads down and were looking at their phones. I could barely grasp any emotion of how they felt.

It would’ve been better, if I had spent more of my time working on the expressions more or even observing the details or focusing on the shapes of their faces. I could of used different materials or drawing methods to reflect on my mark making rotation, so if I do this in future, such as on a moving vehicle like a bus or if I go to Wetherspoons on a Wednesday, like I usually do with my friends, then I can work on getting down some more drawings then.

The drawings I have so far though; I’m actually quite happy I got so many marks down, but as I have said, it would of been better if I did spend a little bit more time observing.